Hanasei Traits

Traits

1. Tail Traits

Information

Hanasei tail length

Lengths of a Hanasei's tail.

Length

The minimum length for a Hanasei tail is around the size of their torso, while the maximum length is slightly bigger than their entire body.

Smaller tails are more durable and better for quick and fast bursts of speed, but are harder to maneuver and have a slower speed for endurance swimming.

Bigger tails can control directions more precisely and are better for long distance swimming, but are prone to breaking off and take more energy to start a burst movement.

Rips and Tears

While a Hanasei's tail is thicker than a normal tadpole caudal fin, they are still prone to being damaged and being ripped apart by impact. Prosthetic tails are a common way to fill the gaps left from incidents, made of waterproof elastics that simulate the properties of their original tail.

Hanasei's tails can show up to 50% of damage, but more than that is currently not allowed.

Common tail tears.

Examples of damaged Hanasei tails


Tail Styles

The examples shown below are only some of the ways these styles can look like. As long as you follow the description, you're free to experiment with your own ideas, and can always ask for help when designing them. New styles may be added in the future, and rarity tiers may shift around.

Note: The rarity system is a mostly in-lore only denomination. All MYOS and redesigns can use any of these traits without needing to buy 'rarity tickets'; the only events that may take in account trait rarity will be fully free ones.

Common
Common tadpole tails.

Tadpole tail examples

Tadpole

Tadpole tails follow a simple cylindrical shape. As their name implies, they are similar to tails found in real life tadpoles and other amphibian larva. Their edges can be shaped in different ways, but they still follow the same base shape.

Tadpole tails do not excel at any specific swimming ability, but are all-around balanced.


Uncommon
Uncommon fish tails.

Fish tail examples

Fish

Fish tails, as the name implies, imitate the shape of dorsal, anal and caudal fins of various fish. Their formation variates, but are not so intricate as to be easy to damage, while still giving advantages to swimming that Tadpole tails do not offer.

Depending on the format, Fish tails can help in direction, speed or endurance, but can also hinder the individual in any of these categories.

Fish tail formations can be more varied than Tadpole, but should not be too intricate and away from the base, as to not imitate a Tendril tail.


Rare
Rare tendril tails.

Tendril tail examples

Tendril

Tendril tails have very complex shapes, with multiple divisions and long and thin membranes, similar to tendrils. They are very prone to damage, and after a certain point of membrane loss, most Hanasei will use prosthetics with more useful tail shapes such as Fish or Tadpole, making them rare to see naturally.

Unless the individual's body traits follow very similar flows to their tail, most Tendril tails do not benefit swimming, and can even hinder it. However, they are very aesthetically pleasing, and are more commonly seen with 'beauty' related professions.

 

2. Horn Traits

Information

Hanasei horns

Area of origin for horns and size variations for the horns, respectively.

Imperfections

Perfect, symmetric horns don't always happen in Hanasei. Having asymmetrical horns, either with different styles or sizes is common. Injuries can crack or even tear apart some of the horn, exposing the internal, sensible parts of the skin. Prosthetic horns are common to replace the lost tissue, along with fillings on cracks, similar to Kintsugi techniques.

Asymmetrical horns can be of different sizes and styles, no matter the rarity.

Horns can be damaged up to 60%, but the damage should not try to emulate the complete lack of horns.

Origins & Size

Hanasei's horns originate around the area above the eye, and can expand fowards, backwards or keep stationary. Their maximum size is the size of their head's length.

Smaller horns cause less drag when swimming, but are not as effective as a weapon. Exceptions can exist.

Larger horns can be very dangerous and great for self defense, but often are less hydrodynamic. Exceptions can exist.

Hanasei horn imperfections

An example of asymmetry in horns and horn damage, respectively.


Horn Styles

The examples shown below are only some of the ways these styles can look like. As long as you follow the description, you're free to experiment with your own ideas, and can always ask for help when designing them. New styles may be added in the future, and rarity tiers may shift around.

Note: The rarity system is a mostly in-lore only denomination. All MYOs and redesigns can use any of these traits without needing to buy 'rarity tickets'; the only events that may take in account trait rarity will be fully free ones.

Common
Common horns.

Examples of Backwards style horns.

Backwards

Backwards style horns grow on the opposite direction as the face, following the body. they may curve around or slightly angle upwards or downwards.

They usually offer the least amount of drag when swimming, but are not good for self defense due to their awkward angle when fighting 1v1. Backwards horns that curve back around can be decent self defense tools, but still are less useful than Forward style horns.


Uncommon
Uncommon horns.

Examples of Forwards style horns.

Forwards

Forward style horns extend from the face, forwards. They can either grow in an upwards or downwards angle, or curve sideways before growing to the front.

They are great for fighting purposes, able to strike down others with a headbutt or head swing, depending on their shape. In trade, they are less suited for swimming, often dragging underwater.

As Hanasei stopped fighting with their horns and moved on to weapons, Fowards style horns lost one of their advantages and individuals with them were less likely to pass down their traits as they lagged in swimming. Nowadays, support for faster swimming made those with Foward style horns to keep up, but now they are less common than Backwards style horns.


Rare
Rare horns.

Examples of Sideways style horns.

Sideways

These horns grow fully sideways. They do not have angles fowards or backwards, only variating if they grow downwards or upwards.

Sidways style horns are not the best for battling, and can excessively drag a Hanasei underwater. Their main bonus is a better self-defense, but the advantages often don't compensate for the difficulty in active swimiming and fighting. This caused them to be way more rarer for a long while.

 
 

3. Cheek Traits

Information

Hanasei croaking

Hanasei croaking

AETHER

The second function of the cheeks is to store Aether, a highly volatile material, found in many Amphibian-like species, along with Hanasei. While other specimen have varied uses for Aether, manipulating it in a way akin to 'magic', most Hanasei do not know how to manipulate it beyound reproduction purposes.

They will cough up Aether in its pure form (a dense liquid of variating colors), and mix it up with another Hanasei's Aether to form an egg. Nowadays, this pure Aether is instead stored by the community and mixed up manually whenever there's a need for more members. Aether donation is obligatory for most and keeps the 'DNA bank' fresh, along with trading Aether inbetween communities to expand the DNA pool and avoid incestual mixes.

CROAK

Hanasei's cheeks, similar to most frogs, are able to expand and deflate. The sound this movement creates variates with every Hanasei, going from deep to high pitched.

While the sound isn't often used, as their Gills can already fullfil the sound quota for them, Croaking can express different emotions, from surprise, to anger and fear. It is an important part of their verbal communication, and one of the few ways they can make sounds underwater.

Hanasei coughing up Aether

Hanasei coughing up Aether. The cheeks flare up with the Aether's color


CHEEK STYLES

The examples shown below are only some of the ways these styles can look like. As long as you follow the description, you're free to experiment with your own ideas, and can always ask for help when designing them. New styles may be added in the future, and rarity tiers may shift around.

Note: The rarity system is a mostly in-lore only denomination. All MYOS and redesigns can use any of these traits without needing to buy 'rarity tickets'; the only events that may take in account trait rarity will be fully free ones. 

Common
Common horns.

Shaped cheek examples

Shaped

This style of cheek has a simple shape and smooth texture. While the most common shape is oval, any simple design fits.

Shaped cheeks have more space for Aether glands, but are considered aesthetically very plain


Uncommon
Uncommon horns.

Textured cheeks examples

Textured

​Textured cheeks can have a variety of different textures and simple shapes, including bumps, spikes, waves, etc.

While the area of the cheek is more fragmented and leave less space for actual Aether glands, it is seen as a more interessing trait, as Aether creation isn't very important for Hanasei culture.